The Proposal

proposalAfter jotting down some notes in Angie’s file, after recommending she drink lots of Gatorade (for the electrolytes), after she explained about how sick she’s been after last week’s recess duty in close to one hundred degree weather on a shadeless blacktop playground … after all that, our doctor looked at us and smiled.  “My wife and I just saw a movie I think you two would really like.  It’s called The Proposal.”

I’d seen the trailers before.  Kind of a “chick flick,” I had thought at the time.  Not that I was being dismissive; there are many “chick flicks” I have enjoyed watching.  Fifty First Dates was good fun.  The Legally Blonde movies were entertaining as they gleefully poked fun at the legal profession.  Come to think of it, when I used the word “chick flick,” I really meant “date movie.”  A “chick flick” is something you’d see on the Lifetime network or Oxygen.  Date movie is a much better description of what I’m talking about, and is more inclusive of great comedy-action movies like The Princess Bride and The Incredibles.   Continue reading The Proposal

Internalizing

When faced with a child who misbehaves, I usually work with the homeroom teacher to try to determine what may be causing or reinforcing the behavior. Standard procedure, I know. But when developing a plan to help manage the child’s behavior, one thing I usually say first of all is, “We can’t ‘make’ a child behave in an appropriate way. What we have to do is take what we have learned about the child and create an environment that compels the child to make the right decisions with regard to his behavior.”

I’ve always thought that was a rather accurate and wise way to put it, if I don’t say so myself. I’ve been explaining it that way to general classroom teachers for over a decade. But I recently went to a conference on PBS, positive behavior supports, and was privileged to hear one of my old grad school professors, Dr. Tim Lewis deliver the keynote address. As he went through his speech which sounded so familiar, I had to chuckle when I heard him say this:

I’ve always been quick to internalize things that work, without attribution. Isn’t it amazing the impact a good teacher can have on students, even when the student is a teacher, too?