Facebook groups redux

I couldn’t resist posting a few more Facebook groups people have brought to my attention since my previous post. Perhaps you will find this final installment amusing.

  • I have ADOS ” Attention Deficit … Oooh, Shiny!
  • I asked “What?” twenty times, so now I’m just gonna pretend I heard what you said.
  • Third grade lied. I never use cursive.
  • I hate when you’re about to drive into the driveway and your favorite song starts.
  • Trying to finish a dream by going back to sleep.
  • The word “epic” is overused!
  • I hate when someone waves and I wave back when they were actually waving at someone behind me.
  • Talking to someone and then realizing they are no longer walking beside you.
  • Laughing so hard you don’t even make any noise.
  • They’re not “suggested friends,” they’re people I’m intentionally avoiding.
  • No Microsoft Word, I DIDN’T spell my last name wrong.
  • I accidentally typed “;)” instead of “:)” and now it’s awkward.
  • We come to love not by finding a perfect person, but by learning to see an imperfect person perfectly.
  • Today I caught myself smiling for no reason… then I realized I was thinking about you.
  • I may be laughing while you tickle me, but I WILL kill you once you stop.
  • For young, first-time voters, it’s similar to clicking the “Like” button, but with limited choices you don’t actually like.

Ballpark

Growing up watching baseball games with my dad was fantastic fun. I knew all the players well then; I collected their cards. We groaned at all the mistakes they made on the field, cheered at all their successes, and chewed over ideas on what they needed to do to go all the way.

Those rare occasions when we actually got to go to the ballpark to watch a game together were among the absolute greatest memories I have as a child. Even in the inexpensive seats, there is an excitement that just doesn’t translate to TV. The cheers, the smell of the food, the fabulous fountains and scoreboard – very few experiences can compare. Transistor radio in my ear, I was an expert with inside knowledge of the game that I periodically shared with my dad. Of course, he would tell me something every bit as profound and relevant, without the radio in his ear.

Everything I’ve done with baseball, from my card collection as a child to my sim league team that I still manage today, is a direct result of this shared enjoyment of a father and son.

Now, of course, I’m married and I’m taking my wife to a Sunday afternoon game. As is often is the case, she’s being quite troublesome. First of all, she’s wearing the colors of our rival team. And she’s cheering them on. At least there are no boos. I hate boos – on both sides.

But after that jarring beginning, we settle into a kind of groove. We savor some nachos, and some chips, fried on the spot, with bleu cheese, bacon, and I’m not sure what else. Delicious! We watch the game. We talk about the plays. We are surprised by the number of foul balls that sail into the stands close to us. We smile at the new and improved scoreboard as it does amazing things. We appreciate nice weather and the cool afternoon breeze blowing in our face. We have a ball together!

We took some pictures, panoramas of the new stadium renovations, the new plaza areas in the outfield (that we explored until they kicked us out), and pictures of the statues of the players my dad and I used to watch play,

I can’t wait to show the pictures to Dad and tell him all about the game!

Facebook groups

Facebook is many things all at the same time: fun, controversial, insecure, synergistic, social, and risky. Friends I haven’t seen in years are now my Facebook friends, and it’s the quickest way to get in touch with some people, replacing email and phone calls.

There are all sorts of little groups you can join in Facebook. For example, I’m a big fan of Fun House Pizza on Noland Road in Independence. Whenever I’m there, I have to get one of their house combos. They have a Facebook group, and you can hit the “like” button. Instantly on your wall, it announces that Todd like’s Fun House Pizza.

There also happen to be other groups to “like” in Facebook. Many of them are humorous. I don’t join groups like that because I like to keep my Facebook relatively lean and mean, but here are a few of those groups I’ve granted a chuckle of recognition to.

  • I stay up late every night, and realize it’s a bad idea every morning.
  • I redo high fives if they weren’t good enough the first time.
  • I daydream while I’m reading so I have to read parts over again.
  • I don’t need anger management. You just need to stop pissing me off.
  • I only check my voicemail to get rid of the little icon on the screen.
  • Accomplishing something before the microwave reaches :00
  • Hates the cold feeling you get when you step out of the shower.
  • 63 notifications later, I regret liking your status
  • I type “lol” and I have a blank expression on my face.
  • Driving in the summer with the windows down and the music turned up.
  • I never go to bed angry. I stay up and plot my revenge.
  • Officer, I did see the speed limit sign. I just didn’t see you.
  • I don’t feel like folding my laundry so I just restart the dryer.
  • Hey, Cupid. Can you shoot both of us next time? Thanks.
  • I hate when you put something in a safe spot so you don’t lose it, and then you can’t find it.
  • I will carry 20 grocery bags into the house at a time to avoid making a second trip.

All of these are real Facebook groups you can join. Which strike a chord with you? Found any others worth a comment here?

Why would I be mad?

I’ve made a startling discovery, but what I’ve learned might help some of you newer husbands or boyfriends out there.

Men’s Dictionary

why-would-I-be-mad : interrogative, 1. attempt to elicit a reason another party thinks you’re mad; 2. expression of surprise at a perceived dissatisfaction; declarative, 3. attempt of reassurance that you are not mad; 4. dismissal of the idea that you are mad; syn. don’t worry, we’re cool.

Women’s Dictionary

why-would-I-be-mad : declarative, 1. confirmation the woman is, in fact, mad; interrogative, 2. a pop quiz for the other party to identify what they did to make you mad, usually involving a penalty for supplying the wrong answer; 3. a signal to prepare an apology; syn you’ve really done it this time, the doghouse is that way.

Peanuts

Many, many books have been written about the significance of Charles Schulz’s comic strip Peanuts. These books can never accomplish the goal they strive for, because art, by its very nature, is experienced by individuals who bring their own unique experiences to the table. I can’t even sum up what the strip means to just me, so let me just say that the first thing I remember reading regularly was Peanuts in the Sunday comics of the Kansas City Star. I was enjoying the strip before Kindergarten at least, because it’s well-documented by family members that I based several school projects at that time on the strip.

I credit the strip not just for encouraging me to read, but for giving me an appreciation of the sublime sense of humor that showed up on our doorstep every Sunday. As I read the collected comic strips in book form now, I can begin to appreciate the layers and depth that Schultz wove into his comic. It’s funny and witty on multiple levels.

Today is the tenth anniversary of Charles Schulz’s passing, and I wanted to share with you a layer I never really fully appreciated in his work. I found this fascinating exhibit called Schulz’s Beethoven that I want to share. It’s on the American Beethoven Society’s website. Enjoy!

http://absadmin.users.sonic.net/schulz/pages/page1.html

Lights

LightsMost all of the Christmas lights are down now. More neighbors than usual put them up this year. I enjoyed the displays driving home from work every day.

The lights in my neighborhood were not the only lights we saw this season. We saw the lights at the Country Club Plaza in Kansas City, with my sister. That was an adventure; the three of us romping around the Plaza like we owned the place. Then the drive through our local light park – this was the first year we tried to capture some of the magnificent displays with our phone cameras.

The holidays are almost always a happy time for me. I remember my mom, and I am thankful for the birth of the Messiah. There is magic in the air, and what I usually see is people treating others with a warmth and kindness that doesn’t always flow the rest of the year.

Something odd happened this year, and I can’t quite put my finger on it. Christmas was drawn out due to weather and sickness. Travel plans were scrapped, and we still hadn’t seen everyone we had planned to see until the weekend before school started again.

Maybe because of the stress, illness and the stretched out season, tension was high and people stepped on each others’ nerves. Some darkness crept into the season this year. The world may seem dark like that sometimes, but if you let yourself really see the lights, you appreciate them even more as they punctuate the darkness and show the way to something better.

Radio weblog

Less than a month ago, I posted about my first webhome closing.  Now that it’s gone, I have quite a few more broken bookmarks that I thought I would now – old “virtual friends” whose early webhomes had been enshrined and, for the most part, untouched since the 1990’s.  I’ll miss those “colorful” (in more ways than one) sites.
History seems to continue closing up behind me as I just discovered that my second webhome, and first “bloghome”, is now shutting its doors.
Radio UserLand service closing
UserLand has decided to close the Radio UserLand and Salon Radio services as of December 31, 2009.
You can continue to use your Radio weblog hosted with UserLand until the end of the year.
Radio UserLand was as much a program as it was a host.  Nowadays, most blogging platforms use server-side magic to generate pages on the fly from your database of content and style templates.  Radio UserLand operated on your local computer, pre-generating all your pages and saving them to your own computer, uploading them to the server as static HTML pages.
I have long since imported the content of that site to this blog.
I’m feeling kind of old now, and I guess I am, in web-years.

radioLess than a month ago, I posted about my first webhome closing.  Now that it’s gone, I have quite a few more broken bookmarks that I thought I would now – old “virtual friends” whose early webhomes had been enshrined and, for the most part, untouched since the 1990’s.  I’ll miss those “colorful” (in more ways than one) sites.

History seems to continue closing up behind me as I just discovered that my second webhome, and first “bloghome”, is now shutting its doors.

Radio UserLand service closing

UserLand has decided to close the Radio UserLand and Salon Radio services as of December 31, 2009.

You can continue to use your Radio weblog hosted with UserLand until the end of the year.

Radio UserLand was as much a program as it was a host.  Nowadays, most blogging platforms use server-side magic to generate pages on the fly from your database of content and style templates.  Radio UserLand operated on your local computer, pre-generating all your pages and saving them to your own computer, uploading them to the server as static HTML pages.

I have long since imported the content of that site to this blog.

I’m feeling kind of old now, and I guess I am, in web-years.

Goodbye, my first webhome

geocitiesTomorrow, Geocities is closing.  If you were around the web in the mid to late ’90’s, you are familiar with the bold, multiform, free-for-all that was the Geocities community.  It was the “free web hosting” site to be on, and you could find practically anything you could imagine there.  That included my very first pages.

Let’s see, there was a home “link-page” that was my very first effort, written on Netscape Composer, as most of my first pages were.  Follow that with my online resume, a page devoted to the Amiga computer, a page that showcased my artwork, a page for the University of Missouri’s Special Education class of ’98, a kid’s homework help link page, a site I wrote for students who wanted to participate in (or even run) their own IEP meetings (that one was featured in the newsletter for the Center for Innovation in Special Education, or CISE), and probably my most popular splash at the time, a website written in honor of the Greek goddess Aphrodite, as depicted by Alexandra Tydings on the TV shows Hercules:  The Legendary Adventures and Xena:  Warrior Princess.  That last one was an experiment in writing something with popular appeal, and it succeeded for its time; it was visited several hundreds of times daily at the height of its popularity.

It was a different era, I guess, when regular people felt free to put up a simple page featuring their eclectic interests.  Now, it’s all done through MySpace or Facebook.  Though I have archives of my old sites (and they will soon be linked to my main page at Todd’s Webspace), I will miss that colorful community.  Goodbye, Geocities!

My projects

TODDCAST RADIO, WWW – After several consecutive weblog entries about movies he’s seen recently, Toddcast Radio has gone dark.  Will it return to the Web once again to propagate ripples of zeros and ones through the information superhighway?  Or has its signal silenced permanently? *crackle, buzz, static* Hello, faithful listeners!  I thought I’d let you know what I’ve been up to.  If I just said “work,” no one would be impressed, so let me share with you some details on the exciting new initiatives I’ve been fortunate enough to be part of at our school.

…let me share with you some details on the exciting new initiatives I’ve been fortunate enough to be part of at our school.

First of all, I’m in charge of our school’s AIMSweb management.  AIMSweb is an online software tool that assists in student benchmarking and progress monitoring.  I’ve been putting in “overtime” learning the program, managing login accounts for our school, and putting together tools and resources for our assessment team to utilize during this year’s three benchmarking periods.  As the year goes on, I’ll be working hard behind the scenes taking and managing our school’s data and generating all manner of reports from the program, in preparation for its use in our building’s “response to intervention” (RtI) implementation over the next few years.

Speaking of schoolwide initiatives, Continue reading My projects